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Cub Scout Pack 531
(Phoenix, Arizona)
 
ScoutLander Contact Our Pack Member Login
http://pack531phoenix.ScoutLander.com

  
 

Upcoming FUN with Pack 531 !

Science Technology Engineering and Math (S.T.E.M.) Day: Saturday, August 27th  Noon-3:00pm

S.T.E.M. Day will be at Northern Hills Community Church: 2740 East Union Hills Dr Phoenix, AZ

1st Den Meetings of School Year/ScoutBook.com Parent Training: Monday, August 29th  6:30-7:30pm

Adams Traditional Academy: 2323 W. Parkside Ln Phoenix, AZ  Building B(West Bldg), use South Parking Lot

Parents: bring your completed paperwork and payment to the Den Meetings

Need help or have questions? call or Text Mr. Rankin at 602-317-7814

Pack Calendar of Events: www.SCOUTBOOK.com


Pics from our August 6th Event: Engineering Through Woodworking
Catapults (left: FIRE DRAGON  and  right: CYCLOPS)
Thank you to all the Scouts and Parents who came out and helped us build these!

PACK 531 PARENTS:  we now use www.scoutbook.com for our Calendar/Events Activities/Your Scout's Advancement Records.  You and your Scout can login together to track progress and stay up to date on Pack 531

Questions? call or text Cubmaster Jess Rankin 602-317-7814

    

 Cub Scouting provides young boys(1st - 5th grade) an opportunity to learn and grow in a fun and challenging environment. 

Scouts grow up to be self-reliant and dependable, worthy and caring. The Cub Scout Dens are:

·TIGER DEN – 1st Grade Boys (Accepting boys August 2016 going into 1st Grade; Need an Extra Den Leader )

·WOLF DEN – 2nd Grade Boys (FULL unless we start a 2nd Den )

·BEAR DEN – 3rd Grade Boys (Accepting boys August 2016 going into 3rd Grade; Need an Extra Den Leader )

·WEBELOS DEN – 4th Grade Boys (FULL unless we have a 2nd Den )

·ARROW OF LIGHT DEN – 5th Grade Boys (FULL )

Looking for BOY SCOUTS for Grades 6-12?  Check out Troop 513 at http://www.troop513.org/


Welcome to Pack 531.
 
We are an active family-oriented Pack chartered by Adams Traditional Academy. Our Dens meet every Monday evening from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. during the school year.  Our monthly "Pack Meeting" is usually the 4th Monday of every month.  

Pack 531 - Adams Traditional Academy (ATA) - 2323 W. Parkside Lane, Phoenix, AZ  85027
(closest cross streets I-17 & Pinnacle Peak Rd)

Questions: azpack531@gmail.com

Parents are awesome, right?!  Parents help provide den and pack leadership to create a quality and exciting program.  Parents also help and assist with pack/den activities throughout the year.  Pack 531 parents are the best!

Our Pack has a Pack Camping trip at the beginning and at the end of the school year.  The Fall Campout focuses on developing scout skills while the Spring/Summer Campout focuses on celebrating successes with a Promotion/Crossover ceremony and participating in outdoor activities.

Our Webelos/Arrow-of-Light Dens are encouraged to also have their own Den campouts throughout the year as well as meet and engage with local Boy Scout Troops to prepare for the transition to Boy Scouting.

We follow BSA guidelines and require our leaders/volunteers to complete Youth Protection Training,  we follow two-deep leadership requirements and participate in den specific training. A BALOO trained leader must be present at all campouts. Our goal is to always provide a safe and secure environment for the Scouts.

We ask all Scouts and Parents to participate and support our two annual fundraising events. The main fundraiser is the Scout’s Chocolate Candy Bars Sale in November and December. The second fundraiser is the Camp Cards in January/February.  These events provide funds for our awards, activities and Pack expenses.  We do very limited fundraising as needed and hope to teach the boys how to present themselves when speaking in public (parents too!).


Pic from our recent Family Camping Trip
PACK 531 ROCKS!

Pack 531 encourages their Scouts to pursue STEM activities in Scouting
and earn the NOVA and SUPERNOVA Awards (for Wolves, Bears and Webelos)



Videos of fun things we have done in Pack 531:








  


Contact Cubmaster Jess Rankin for more info: 602-317-7814  azpack531@gmail.com


Cub Scout Pack 531 is part of The Boy Scouts of America which is one of the nation's largest and most prominent values-based youth development organizations. The BSA provides a program for young people that builds character, trains them in the responsibilities of participating citizenship, and develops personal fitness.

For over a century, the BSA has helped build the future leaders of this country by combining educational activities and lifelong values with fun. The Boy Scouts of America believes — and, through over a century of experience, knows — that helping youth is a key to building a more conscientious, responsible, and productive society.

Our Pack is located in North Phoenix.  Typically boys in our Cub Scout Pack 531 are from these zip codes and towns: 85027 Phoenix, 85023 Phoenix, 85024 Phoenix, 85308 Glendale, 85022 Phoenix, 85024 Phoenix, 85085 Phoenix, 85086 Anthem, 85086 Desert Hills, 85086 Tramonto, 85085 Norterra, 85085 Fireside, 85310 Glendale, Phoenix 85083, 85029 Phoenix and more. Cub Scout Pack 19 Arizona

 

The Purposes of Cub Scouting

Since 1930, the Boy Scouts of America has helped younger boys through Cub Scouting. It is a year-round family program designed for boys who are in the first grade through fifth grade (or 7, 8, 9, and 10 years of age). Parents, leaders, and organizations work together to achieve the purposes of Cub Scouting. Currently, Cub Scouting is the largest of the BSA`s three membership divisions. (The others are Boy Scouting and Venturing.)

The ten purposes of Cub Scouting are:

  1. Character Development
  2. Spiritual Growth
  3. Good Citizenship
  4. Sportsmanship and Fitness
  5. Family Understanding
  6. Respectful Relationships
  7. Personal Achievement
  8. Friendly Service
  9. Fun and Adventure
  10. Preparation for Boy Scouts

Membership

Cub Scouting members join a Cub Scout pack and are assigned to a den, usually a neighborhood group of six to eight boys. Tiger Cubs (first-graders), Wolf Cub Scouts (second-graders), Bear Cub Scouts (third-graders), and Webelos Scouts (fourth- and fifth-graders) meet weekly.

Once a month, all of the dens and family members gather for a pack meeting under the direction of a Cubmaster and pack committee. The committee includes parents of boys in the pack and members of the chartered organization.

 

Volunteer Leadership

Thousands of volunteer leaders, both men and women, are involved in the Cub Scout program. They serve in a variety of positions, as everything from unit leaders to pack committee chairmen, committee members, den leaders, and chartered organization representatives.

Like other phases of the Scouting program, a Cub Scout pack belongs to an organization with interests similar to those of the BSA. This organization, which might be a church, school, community organization, or group of interested citizens, is chartered by the local BSA council to use the Scouting program. This chartered organization provides a suitable meeting place, adult leadership, supervision, and opportunities for a healthy Scouting life for the boys under its care. Each organization appoints one of its members as a chartered organization representative. The organization, through the pack committee, is responsible for providing leadership, the meeting place, and support materials for pack activities.

Who Pays For It?

Groups responsible for supporting Cub Scouting are the boys and their parents, the pack, the chartered organization, and the community. The boy is encouraged to pay his own way by contributing dues each week. Packs also obtain income by working on approved money-earning projects. The community, including parents, supports Cub Scouting through the United Way, Friends of Scouting enrollment, bequests, and special contributions to the BSA local council. This financial support provides leadership training, outdoor programs, council service centers and other facilities, and professional service for units.

Advancement Plan

On the advancement trail, a Cub Scout progresses from rank to rank, learning new skills as he goes. Each of the ranks and awards in Cub Scouting has its own requirements. As you advance through the ranks, the requirements get more challenging, to match the new skills and abilities you learn as you get older. For more information on advancement, visit CubScouts.org .


Bobcat

No matter what age or grade a boy joins Cub Scouting, he must earn his Bobcat badge before he can advance to the rank of Tiger, Wolf, Bear, or Webelos. A boy must complete the Bobcat requirements, which include:

  • Learn and say the Cub Scout motto, the Scout Oath, and the Scout Law and tell what they mean;
  • Show the Cub Scout sign, salute, and handshake and tell what they mean; and
  • With your parent or guardian complete the exercises in the pamphlet How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent's Guide.


 

Tiger

The Tiger rank is for boys who are in first grade or are age 7. To earn the Tiger badge, a boy must complete six required adventures with his den or family and one elective adventure of his den or family’s choosing. As the boy completes each adventure, he will receive the adventure loop for that adventure, which he can wear on his belt. When the boy has completed the seven required adventures, he can receive the Tiger badge. The Tiger badge is given to the boy’s adult partner at a pack meeting. Then, during a grand ceremony, the adult gives the badge to the boy.

After he has earned the Tiger badge, a Tiger Scout can work on the remaining 12 Tiger electives until he finishes first grade (or turn 8 years old). He can choose elective adventures that may show him new hobbies and teach him skills that will be useful during his Boy Scout years. When he completes an elective adventure, he receives an additional adventure loop to wear on his belt.


 

Wolf

The Wolf rank is for boys who have finished first grade (or who are 8 years old). To earn the Wolf badge, a boy must complete six required adventures and one elective adventure. His parent or guardian and den leader approves each requirement by signing his book, and the boy receives an adventure loop for each adventure. When the boy has met all requirements, the Wolf badge is presented to his parent or guardian at the next pack meeting. During an impressive ceremony, the parent or guardian then presents the badge to the boy.

After he has earned the Wolf badge, a Wolf Scout can work on the remaining 12 Wolf electives until he finishes second grade (or turns 9 years old). He can choose elective adventures that may show him new hobbies and teach him skills that will be useful during his Boy Scout years. When he completes an elective adventure, he receives an additional adventure loop to wear on his belt.


Bear

The Bear rank is for boys who have finished second grade (or who are 9 years old). To earn the Bear badge, a boy must complete six required adventures and one elective adventure. His parent or guardian and den leader approves each requirement by signing his book, and the boy receives an adventure loop for each adventure. When the boy has met all requirements, the Bear badge is presented to his parent or guardian at the next pack meeting. During an impressive ceremony, the parent or guardian then presents the badge to the boy.

After he has earned the Bear badge, a Bear Scout can work on the remaining 12 Bear electives until he finishes third grade (or turn 10 years old). He can choose elective adventures that may show him new hobbies and teach him skills that will be useful during his Boy Scout years. When he completes an elective adventure, he receives an additional adventure loop to wear on his belt.


 

Webelos

Webelos dens are for boys who have completed third grade (or reached age 10). Webelos Scouts get to work on the five required Webelos adventures and choose two of the 18 elective adventures that are shared by the Webelos and Arrow of Light ranks.
When a boy has done the requirements for an adventure, the Webelos den leader, rather than a parent, approves most of the adventures. For each adventure a boy completes, he receives a pin to wear on the Webelos colors or on his hat. After completing seven adventures, including five required adventures and two elective adventures, a Scout can receive the Webelos badge.

After he has earned the Webelos badge, a Webelos Scout can work on the remaining 18 shared Webelos and Arrow of Light electives until he finishes fourth grade (or turns 11 years old). He can choose elective adventures that may show him new hobbies and teach him skills that will be useful during his Boy Scout years. When he completes an elective adventure, he receives an additional adventure loop to wear on his belt.


 

Arrow of Light

The highest rank in Cub Scouting is the Arrow of Light. Earning this rank prepares a Webelos Scout to become a Boy Scout. Scouts must complete four required adventures and three elective adventures to earn the Arrow of Light rank. For each adventure a boy completes, he receives a pin to wear on the Webelos colors or on his hat.

The Arrow of Light badge is the only Cub Scout badge that can be worn on the Boy Scout uniform when a boy graduates into a troop. Adult leaders who earned the Arrow of Light rank when they were young may also show their achievement by wearing a special square knot on their adult uniform.

Activities

Cub Scouting means "doing." Everything in Cub Scouting is designed to have the boys doing things. Activities are used to achieve the aims of Scouting - citizenship training, character development, and personal fitness.

Many of the activities happen right in the den and pack. The most important are the weekly den meetings and the monthly pack meetings.

Camping

Age-appropriate camping programs are packed with theme-oriented action that brings Tiger Cubs, Cub Scouts, and Webelos Scouts into the great out-of-doors. Day camping comes to the boy in neighborhoods across the country; resident camping is at least a three-day experience in which Cub Scouts and Webelos Scouts camp within a developed theme of adventure and excitement. "Cub Scout Worlds" are used by many councils to carry the world of imagination into reality with actual theme structures of castles, forts, ships, etc. Cub Scout pack families enjoy camping in local council camps and other council-approved campsites. Camping programs combine fun and excitement with doing one`s best, getting along with others, and developing an appreciation for ecology and the world of the outdoors.

Publications

Volunteers are informed of national news and events through Scouting magazine (circulation 900,000). Boys may subscribe to Boys` Life magazine (circulation 1.3 million). Both are published by the Boy Scouts of America. Also available are a number of youth and leader publications, including the Tiger Cub Handbook, Wolf Handbook, Bear Handbook, Webelos Handbook, Cub Scout Leader Book, Cub Scout Program Helps, and Webelos Leader Guide.

Scout Oath

On my honor I will do my best
To do my duty to God and my country
and to obey the Scout Law;
To help other people at all times:
To keep myself physically strong,
mentally awake, and morally straight.

 

 “This site is the personal website of Pack 531 and is reflective only of the administrators' personal views, thoughts, and opinions. This site does not have the endorsement of the Boy Scouts of America, and it is not an official communication channel of the Boy Scouts of America.”

Attachments
Icon File Name Comment  
Cub Scout Pack 531 Fun Fact Sheet.pdf